Wednesday, October 27, 2010

An Elizabethan ruff

It's strange what insomnia can do. That odd state of being half-aware a couple of nights ago produced this method for making an Elizabethan ruff.
I had been trying to work out how to make a ruff for over two years without success, but ta-da! here is the first one. It needs a bit more tweaking, but I'm happy with it so far.

23 comments:

  1. It's looks great, very delicate and super hard to make, well done, it's fab :)
    Julia xx

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  2. GOSH! It looks FANTASTIC Glenda. I am really impressed!!!!

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  3. Wow that ruff looks really great! Fantastic work Glenda! I could have stayed awake many nights and still not being able to make anything remotely as neat as that.. :-)

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  4. Good grief gal - that's fantastic!!

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  5. Nicely done, Glenda. What did you use? The 1/4 (scale) "Pretty Pleat" (by D.Anne Ruff) makes teensy little pleats like that. I once used narrowish lace to make a ruff with it, which also worked out well...though, alas, I've never dressed the doll for whom it was intended. :-/

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  6. My insomia makes me mad and yours is very ceative ;) Beautiful work!

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  7. I'm most creative during those nights when I can't sleep too. Scientists should probably look into that. :-)

    http://ficklecattle.blogspot.com/

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  8. WOW Glenda!!! That is really beautiful! I am absolutely no good with a needle and string in normal scale, can't imagine with something so tiny! :)

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  9. Glenda, That is the most perfect collar I have seen! Well done!!

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  10. Thanks for your kind comments, ladies!

    Tabitha - it's hand sewn/pleated - I had to use an extremely fine needle. Only to be attempted on a day when my eyesight is ok, LOL
    I thought of using lace, but joining it to plain fabric is out of the question (too thick and unwieldy on the join), and it's hard to find a fine lace in Elizabethan style (pointy edges) that is made of cotton or silk. (Can't stand using polyester!) Another thing to search out on the five year plan . . . :)
    Glenda

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  11. Glenda, that is simply amazing. Beautiful workmanship!

    Cia

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  12. It looks really good Glenda, are you going to dress a doll?

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  13. Margaret - no, no doll. I'm not going to do much Tudor, I just like a challenge, and this was on the backburner :)

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  14. I think you could probably find such a lace somewhere. There are lots of outlets for "new" vintage cotton laces in that style. You might even find something suitable on an old hankie. If it was wide enough, you could just pleat it by itself and put it around the dolls neck. I mean, they were an "add-on" even in Elizabeth's time so you wouldn't have to attach it to anything else. Lace would be pretty on a lady and you could use your plain cotton one on the gent.... :-)

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  15. Es maravilloso, me encanta como te ha quedado.
    besitos ascension

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  16. Tabitha - good idea about old hankies! - they're usually washed so much they're already very fine.

    I tried it on my medieval man, but since he's not got any clothes yet it looked somewhat 'interesting' - in a sort of dubious tudor bawdy way!!

    Off to get out my pile of old hankies . . .

    Glenda

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  17. Glenda, that looks brilliant! You have such clever fingers. Thanks so much for your message -- all is well :)

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  18. Oooh, this is awesome... you must now I was working on the same subject... for almost two years and it drove me mad! I am a lacemaker and work in 1 to 12 scale too. The technique that was originally used, thread lace, is one of the earliest lace and tricky to reproduce in scale.

    Like you said, extreme fine cotton (silk threads are too thick) can do the trick but is is very hard to reproduce. Even just the looks of that technique. But here is an almost perfect example of it. All that's missing are the typical triangles at the edge... but this looks GREAT.

    I would almost settle for insomnia if this was the outcome... but it's not something i wish for, not even for my worst enemy. Take care if you're still suffering from it!

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  19. Thanks, Debora - I'm a lacemaker too, and the Elizabethan lace style is just too difficult for me in miniature so far.

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  20. shake hands Glenda :-) But it still is a challenge...
    And you've found a way around it. I like that

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  21. ¡Perfecto trabajo! Me gusta mucho lo que has conseguido con el insomnio :)
    Enhorabuena por este cuello. Me encanta.
    Besos Clara

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  22. You are a lacemaker? WOW! No wonder ! I feel better now that I know why I will never be able to make that ruffle thing :).

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